How To Take Seeds Out Of Weed

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Western Integrated Pest Management Center For the latest IPM news and funding announcements, subscribe to our monthly newsletter. Targeting Weed Seeds at Harvest As herbicide-resistant Does anyone out there known of an easy way to get seed out of buds without destroying the bud itself? What can you do with marijuana seeds you find at the bottom of the bag? Wonder no more. Here's what to do with weed seeds.

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Targeting Weed Seeds at Harvest

As herbicide-resistant weeds become more common across the country, researchers and growers are looking for other ways to control weeds.

In Colorado, they’re looking to techniques and technology developed in Australia, which has significant issues with herbicide-resistant weeds.

Known as harvest weed-seed control, these IPM-friendly methods are designed to destroy or remove weed seeds during harvest to prevent them from raining down onto the soil and replenishing the weed seed bank. In Colorado wheat, weed species of concern are winter annual grasses that share the grain’s growing cycle, like jointed goatgrass, feral rye and downy brome.

“In harvest weed-seed control, the objective is to prevent those seed-bank increases,” explained Colorado State University doctoral candidate Neeta Soni. “There are a number of ways to do it, and we’re investigating to see if they could be adopted in Colorado.”

One way to destroy the weeds seeds is by directing chaff during harvest into a cage mill – imagine a giant coffee grinder – and pulverizing the chaff and weed seeds into powder. That’s the idea behind an Australian innovation known as the Harrington Seed Destructor (and a new competitor called the Seed Terminator).

Another option is to use a piece of equipment called a chaff deck to gather chaff into mounded strips behind the harvester, capturing the weed seed in those mounds of chaff. In some places those chaff strips can be burned, and in others they’re left alone to allow the weed seeds to decay without entering the soil.

A third option is to use chaff carts and collect all the chaff and captured weed seeds for off-site destruction.

“Our research is focused on finding out if there is potential to use these methods in Colorado,” explained Soni, a graduate student of assistant professor Todd Gaines. “So what we needed to know is whether, at harvest, the majority of the winter annual grass seeds are retained in the upper wheat canopy, where they would be vulnerable to the seed destructor or other methods.”

If the weed seeds have already shattered and fallen to the soil, or if the weed seeds are below the cutting height of the combine, the methods would not be as effective.

So the Weed Research Lab team measured and counted a lot of weeds.

“What we found is that the majority of seeds are still retained at harvest,” Soni said. “Downy brome is the same height as wheat, rye is taller and jointed goatgrass a little shorter, but growers could adjust their cut height to manage it.”

Soni then counted out 1,000 seeds of each weed species into a specified amount of chaff and drove to the University of Arkansas where they have a seed destructor set up on a test platform. She ran each bundle through the destructor. The pulverized material was dusted across beds of soil to see if any weed seeds germinated. Virtually none did.

“The seed destructor was 98 percent effective on downy brome and jointed goatgrass, and 99 percent effective on feral rye,” Soni said.

The Gaines lab hopes to conduct field trials with the equipment. They will also study if the strips of mounded chaff are effective in Colorado, or if the state’s dry and windy conditions enable weed seeds to survive and spread.

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The seed destructor isn’t commercially available in the United States yet, but a number of researchers are testing versions in different regions and in different crops. The initial model was a tow-behind trailer, but both Australian manufacturers now offer the technology integrated into a combine harvester that retails between $120,000 and $160,000 Australian dollars.

Not every grower would need to buy one.

“It is very common that growers here have their harvesting done by a contractor,” Soni said, “so this could be an extra service they provide.”

But not at every harvest. Because whatever specific iteration of harvest weed-seed control Colorado growers may eventually adopt, it should be just one element of an integrated management strategy, Soni cautioned.

“Repeated use could lead to the selection of earlier-shattering weed seeds, or shorter weeds,” she said. “It has to be used in rotation with other integrated measures, including herbicides and crop rotation.”

In short, it should be part of an IPM program.

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Easy way to get seed out of bud

Does anyone out there known of an easy way to get seed out of buds without destroying the bud itself?

CA MTN MAN
Well-Known Member
shynee mac
Well-Known Member

nope but I know how to get bud out of seed without destroying the buds. jkd you could google “single bud pollination” and its ways to pollinate single buds but if your new to breeding id say just fuck up the whole plant. no pain no gain

GroErr
Well-Known Member

Does anyone out there known of an easy way to get seed out of buds without destroying the bud itself?

If it’s seeded by accident you either don’t sell it, hash it, or discount it. There’s no practical way to de-seed without destroying the buds. I de-seed and put the remnants into the hash/trim bin.

The303Yeti
Well-Known Member

If it’s seeded by accident you either don’t sell it, hash it, or discount it. There’s no practical way to de-seed without destroying the buds. I de-seed and put the remnants into the hash/trim bin.

Well-Known Member
GroErr
Well-Known Member

He didn’t say but I was assuming by the question that he accidentally seeded some bud and is trying to save it.

I seed bud all the time on purpose and when I de-seed the buds, that trim left over goes into small jars. It’s then ready to roll or stick into my pipe, bonus in my books, two-for-one

Well-Known Member

He didn’t say but I was assuming by the question that he accidentally seeded some bud and is trying to save it.

I seed bud all the time on purpose and when I de-seed the buds, that trim left over goes into small jars. It’s then ready to roll or stick into my pipe, bonus in my books, two-for-one

That’s how I do it too

GroErr
Well-Known Member

That’s how I do it too

Yeah either that or the hash bin if I have more around than I can smoke/vape. I’ve seen postings about how seeded bud is not as good, lmao

Bugeye
Well-Known Member

New German teleporter technology makes it easy to deseed and causes zero damage to buds.

GuyLeDuche
Well-Known Member

Last time I had some I pushed it through a metal pasta strainer. Got back a pile of nice seeds and a pile of bud powder lol. Worked great in the vaporizer, but I didn’t like smoking it (maybe too many hull remnants). I ended up running a bunch of QWISO with most of it and that worked out great too.

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The303Yeti
Well-Known Member

New German teleporter technology makes it east to deseed and cause zero damage to buds.

chuck estevez
Well-Known Member

easiest way to remove it is to sell it and tell people it has seeds. let them deal with it, or poke seeds out with point of scissors.

Larry Gardener
Well-Known Member

So far I haven’t got rid of any of my smoke, so I’m just doing it as I smoke it. But when I first harvested I went through and “shucked” out what was easy to get. Then I tried to push the seeded buds to the back of the queue, so now that it’s time to plant, they are what I have left. Worked out pretty good.

Lucky Luke
Well-Known Member

If its heavily seeded it can be a pain.

I bought a real seedy ounce once (someone did the “old switcheroo” on me). was a pain in the backside .. but i smoked it.

Then put in a small hydro set up and used some of those seeds..

Deusracing
Well-Known Member

Honestly my out door spur d that hermied due to stress is far more potent than my indoor. I’m baffled. I was wondering if you can blow it without effecting the taste so much. Or even just edible butter

Herb & Suds
Well-Known Member

Honestly my out door spur d that hermied due to stress is far more potent than my indoor. I’m baffled. I was wondering if you can blow it without effecting the taste so much. Or even just edible butter

GroBud
Well-Known Member

I ran this auto for seeds tossed the entire plant afterwords. With hundreds of seeds genetically matching that plant never do I try to be gentle. Besides the plants long past harvest once sacs open and seeds start falling out. To me being a month or more past harvest time makes the bud no good. Unless you prefer 90% amber mixed with disintegrated trichomes

Damn I got tricked lol 2016 read never skim

Attachments
riuoldmember
Well-Known Member

put it in a contractor bag and hang it from a tree and get a bat and hit it like a piñata. keep rearranging the stalks and shaking them after you hit it a bunch of times.

What To Do With Your Spare Weed Seeds

If you find seeds in your cannabis and were wondering what to do with them, you should know that you have quite a few options.

Ever find seeds in your cannabis and find yourself wondering what to do with weed seeds? When you buy a bag of weed from a competent grower, you should be getting sinsemilla, which is seedless clusters of cannabis flowers from female plants that have been protected from being pollinated. When female plants are not pollinated, they continue to grow more and more flowers, sticky with resin and potent in cannabinoids.

But if female plants are pollinated because there are male or hermaphrodite plants growing nearby, the flowers will contain seeds. You’ll want to separate the seeds from the herb before you smoke. The burning seeds have an unpleasant acrid taste, and won’t get you high anyway. So what can you do with marijuana seeds?

What Can You Do With Marijuana Seeds?

What to do with weed seeds depends somewhat on how many you have. If you only have a few seeds, you might consider planting them and trying your hand at growing pot. Cannabis cultivation can be a fun and rewarding hobby. Many a master grower got their start by wondering what to do with weed seeds they had laying around.

If you have a lot of heavily seeded pot or have been collecting cannabis seeds for a while, you might have a source of food for yourself, or perhaps even your furry or feathered friends. And if smoking pot gets your creative juices flowing, another answer to what to do with weed seeds is use them as a fun new artistic medium.

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Weed Seeds Uses #1: New Plants

What can you do with marijuana seeds? Plant them, of course! All flora that produce seeds do so in order to create the next generation of plants, and cannabis is no exception. If you give your seeds the right environmental conditions including moisture and temperature, they will germinate, or sprout, and begin to grow. Nurturing young plants with the proper light, water, and nutrients will allow them to grow to a size suitable for flowering.

When the nighttime period of darkness gets long enough, either through the change of seasons outdoors or by adjusting the on/off light cycle in a grow room, the plants you started from seed will begin to flower. If you observe your plants closely, you’ll be able to determine which are female and which are male. Unless you want to produce seed, remove all male plants as you identify them. A couple more months of diligent care, and you will be ready to harvest your own free weed! All because you wondered what to do with weed seeds left in the bottom of a baggie.

Weed Seeds Uses #2: A Tasty Snack

Some research suggests that humans have cultivated cannabis as a food source for millennia. Cannabis seeds are rich in healthy fats and have protein, all nine essential amino acids, potassium, iron, Vitamin A, and dietary fiber. The seeds also have zinc and magnesium and are naturally low in carbohydrates.

Whole pot seeds can be made into hemp milk by adding water and mixing well in a blender before straining. Whole seeds can also be eaten whole roasted or raw, but some find the shells unappetizing or difficult to digest.

Marijuana seeds can also be shelled and used as hemp hearts. To shell seeds, place as many as possible in one layer between two cutting boards. Tap the top board with a hammer just lightly enough to crack the shells without flattening the seeds. Place in a bucket of water and stir vigorously. The shells will float. Skim them off before straining and drying the hemp hearts.

Sprinkle hemp seeds over yogurt, salads, or oatmeal to add a mild nutty crunch that is packed with healthy nutrients.

Weed Seeds Uses #3: Animal Food

What can you do with marijuana seeds if you’re an animal lover? Share them with your bird and rodent friends! The nutrition found in weed seeds is good for more than just humans, so add some to the feed for pet birds, hamsters, mice, and rats. Or add them to an outdoor bird feeder as a treat for wild feathered friends.

Weed Seeds Uses #4: Be an Artist!

A recent visit to Etsy, the online marketplace for hand-crafted goods and art, revealed jewelry made from pot seeds suspended in acrylic for earrings, necklaces, and more. Pot seeds are also an interesting subject for photographers, particularly those who create macro images.

Marijuana seeds naturally come in a range of colors including white, cream, and green when they are immature. Fully mature seeds can be found in shades of tan, brown, and nearly black. An abundance of the full palette of colors could be the perfect medium for a 420-friendly mosaic for a patient and talented artist.

Usually, you won’t want to find yourself with a bunch of pot seeds. But if you do have a steady supply and are inclined to collect them, you can put the seeds to use in a variety of ways. Have you thought of any more?

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